subconscious celebrity
blackourstory:

THIS is why they don’t teach you about Fannie Lou Hamer - even in February.

blackourstory:

THIS is why they don’t teach you about Fannie Lou Hamer - even in February.

x09:

Shaun King via twitter

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

amroyounes:

8 vegetables that you can regrow again and again.

Scallions

You can regrow scallions by leaving an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water in a well-lit room.

Garlic

When garlic begins to sprout, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a mild flavor than garlic and can be added to salads, pasta and other dishes.

Bok Choy

Bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In 1-2 weeks , you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

Carrots

Put carrot tops in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit room or a window sill.  You’ll have carrot tops to use in salads. 

Basil

Put clippings from basil with 3 to 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, plant them in pots to and in time it will grow a full basil plant.

Celery

Cut off the base of the celery and place it in a saucer or shallow bowl of warm water in the sun. Leaves will begin to thicken and grow in the middle of the base, then transfer the celery to soil. 

Romaine Lettuce

Put romaine lettuce stumps in a 1/2 inch of water. Re-water to keep water level at 1/2 inch. After a few days, roots and new leaves will appear and you can transplant it into soil.

Cilantro

The stems of cilantro will grown when placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, plant them in a pot in a well-lit room. You will have a full plant in a few months.

theafrocentricasian:

Maat or maʻat (thought to have been pronounced also spelled māt or mayet, was the ancient Egyptian concept of truth, balance, order, law, morality, and justice. Maat was also personified as a goddess regulating the stars, seasons, and the actions of both mortals and the deities, who set the order of the universe from chaos at the moment of creation.
The 42 Laws of Maat
1. I have not committed murder, neither have I bid any man to slay on my behalf;
2. I have not committed rape, neither have I forced any woman to commit fornication;
3. I have not avenged myself, nor have I burned with rage;
4. I have not caused terror, nor have I worked affliction;
5. I have caused none to feel pain, nor have I worked grief;
6. I have done neither harm nor ill, nor I have caused misery;
7. I have done no hurt to man, nor have I wrought harm to beasts;
8. I have made none to weep;
9. I have had no knowledge of evil, neither have I acted wickedly, nor have I wronged the people;
10. I have not stolen, neither have I taken that which does not belong to me, nor that which belongs to another, nor have I taken from the orchards, nor snatched the milk from the mouth of the babe;
11. I have not defrauded, neither I have added to the weight of the balance, nor have I made light the weight in the scales;
12. I have not laid waste the plowed land, nor trampled down the fields;
13. I have not driven the cattle from their pastures, nor have I deprived any of that which was rightfully theirs;
14. I have accused no man falsely, nor have I supported any false accusation;
15. I have spoken no lies, neither have I spoken falsely to the hurt of another;
16. I have never uttered fiery words, nor have I stirred up strife;
17. I have not acted guilefully, neither have I dealt deceitfully, nor spoken to deceive to the hurt another;
18. I have not spoken scornfully, nor have I set my lips in motion against any man;
19. I have not been an eavesdropper;
20. I have not stopped my ears against the words of Right and Truth;
21. I have not judged hastily, nor have I judged harshly;
22. I have committed no crime in the place of Right and Truth;
23. I have caused no wrong to be done to the servant by his master;
24. I have not been angry without cause;
25. I have not turned back water at its springtide, nor stemmed the flow of running water;
26. I have not broken the channel of a running water;
27. I have never fouled the water, nor have I polluted the land;
Sins
28. I have not cursed nor despised God, nor have I done that which God does abominate;
29. I have not vexed or angered God;
30. I have not robbed God, nor have I filched that which has been offered in the temples;
31. I have not added unto nor have I minished the offerings which are due;
32. I have not purloined the cakes of the gods;
33. I have not carried away the offerings made unto the blessed dead;
34. I have not disregarded the season for the offerings which are appointed;
35. I have not turned away the cattle set apart for sacrifice;
36. I have not thwarted the processions of the god;
37. I have not slaughtered with evil intent the cattle of the god;
Personal Transgressions
38. I have not acted guilefully nor have I acted in insolence;
39. I have not been overly proud, nor have I behaved myself with arrogance;
40. I have never magnified my condition beyond what was fitting;
41. Each day have I labored more than was required of me;
42. My name has not come forth to the boat of the Prince.—with Maat and 2 others.

theafrocentricasian:

Maat or maʻat (thought to have been pronounced also spelled māt or mayet, was the ancient Egyptian concept of truth, balance, order, law, morality, and justice. Maat was also personified as a goddess regulating the stars, seasons, and the actions of both mortals and the deities, who set the order of the universe from chaos at the moment of creation.

The 42 Laws of Maat

1. I have not committed murder, neither have I bid any man to slay on my behalf;

2. I have not committed rape, neither have I forced any woman to commit fornication;

3. I have not avenged myself, nor have I burned with rage;

4. I have not caused terror, nor have I worked affliction;

5. I have caused none to feel pain, nor have I worked grief;

6. I have done neither harm nor ill, nor I have caused misery;

7. I have done no hurt to man, nor have I wrought harm to beasts;

8. I have made none to weep;

9. I have had no knowledge of evil, neither have I acted wickedly, nor have I wronged the people;

10. I have not stolen, neither have I taken that which does not belong to me, nor that which belongs to another, nor have I taken from the orchards, nor snatched the milk from the mouth of the babe;

11. I have not defrauded, neither I have added to the weight of the balance, nor have I made light the weight in the scales;

12. I have not laid waste the plowed land, nor trampled down the fields;

13. I have not driven the cattle from their pastures, nor have I deprived any of that which was rightfully theirs;

14. I have accused no man falsely, nor have I supported any false accusation;

15. I have spoken no lies, neither have I spoken falsely to the hurt of another;

16. I have never uttered fiery words, nor have I stirred up strife;

17. I have not acted guilefully, neither have I dealt deceitfully, nor spoken to deceive to the hurt another;

18. I have not spoken scornfully, nor have I set my lips in motion against any man;

19. I have not been an eavesdropper;

20. I have not stopped my ears against the words of Right and Truth;

21. I have not judged hastily, nor have I judged harshly;

22. I have committed no crime in the place of Right and Truth;

23. I have caused no wrong to be done to the servant by his master;

24. I have not been angry without cause;

25. I have not turned back water at its springtide, nor stemmed the flow of running water;

26. I have not broken the channel of a running water;

27. I have never fouled the water, nor have I polluted the land;

Sins

28. I have not cursed nor despised God, nor have I done that which God does abominate;

29. I have not vexed or angered God;

30. I have not robbed God, nor have I filched that which has been offered in the temples;

31. I have not added unto nor have I minished the offerings which are due;

32. I have not purloined the cakes of the gods;

33. I have not carried away the offerings made unto the blessed dead;

34. I have not disregarded the season for the offerings which are appointed;

35. I have not turned away the cattle set apart for sacrifice;

36. I have not thwarted the processions of the god;

37. I have not slaughtered with evil intent the cattle of the god;

Personal Transgressions

38. I have not acted guilefully nor have I acted in insolence;

39. I have not been overly proud, nor have I behaved myself with arrogance;

40. I have never magnified my condition beyond what was fitting;

41. Each day have I labored more than was required of me;

42. My name has not come forth to the boat of the Prince.—with Maat and 2 others.

shanellbklyn:

the-uncensored-she:

nelaguilvr:

iamchantaya:

rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.

She was preaching

this gave me chills

RIP Michael Brown

Jesus my heart….

yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa
Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.
The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  
 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 
The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.
The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.
( Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)

yearningforunity:

a—fri—ca:

The Ishango Bone, the world’s oldest mathematical object found in Africa

Most histories of mathematics devote only a few pages to Ancient Egypt and to northern Africa during the ‘Middle Ages´. Generally they ignore the history of mathematics in Africa south of the Sahara and give the impression that this history either did not exist or, at least, is not knowable, traceable, or, stronger still, that there was no mathematics at all south of the Sahara. In history, to Europeans, even the Africanity of Egyptian mathematics is often denied or suffers eurocentric views of conceptions of both ‘history’ and of ‘mathematics’ form the basis of such views.

The Ishango Bone was discovered in 1960 by Jean Heinzelin Braucourt, a Belgian national who was exploring the eastern fringes of the Democratic republic of Congo, then Belgian Congo. The bone was found among the ruins of a human settlement that was located near Lake Edward, an ancient settlement that had been buried by a volcanic eruption. It is a dark brown length of bone, the fibula of a baboon, with a sharp piece of quartz affixed to one end, perhaps for engraving.  

 Evidently the Ishango bone was designed as a tool for making incisions, but its bone handle was itself incised. The arrangement of the notches engraved on the handle, and the numbers in each group, are clearly not casual. Analysis of their numerological properties has led several investigators to conclude that the artefact is not a simple tally stick, but a kind of calculator based on special number systems. 

The artifact was first estimated to have originated between 9,000 BC and 6,500 BC. However, the dating of the site where it was discovered was re-evaluated, and it is now believed to be more than 20,000 years old.

The Ishango bone is on permanent display in l’Institut Royal Belge des Sciences Naturelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Ishango Bone - UNESCO Astronomy and World Heritage - an old Mathematical Object)

or-ma-ka-or:

interesting cycle of life and death !?1 

or-ma-ka-or:

interesting cycle of life and death !?1 

rebelbaes:

jollyrogers777:

So fucking cool

they are demonstrating their killing techniques to each other.

rebelbaes:

jollyrogers777:

So fucking cool

they are demonstrating their killing techniques to each other.